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LIVE STREAM:
Streaming media are multimedia that are constantly received by and presented to an end-user while being delivered by a provider. Its verb form, "to stream", refers to the process of delivering media in this manner; the term refers to the delivery method of the medium rather than the medium itself.

A client media player can begin playing the data (such as a movie) before the entire file has been transmitted. Distinguishing delivery method from the media distributed applies specifically to telecommunications networks, as most other delivery systems are either inherently streaming (e.g., radio, television) or inherently nonstreaming (e.g., books, video cassettes, audio CDs). For example, in the 1930s, elevator music was among the earliest popularly available streaming media; nowadays Internet television is a common form of streamed media. The term "streaming media" can apply to media other than video and audio such as live closed captioning, ticker tape, and real-time text, which are all considered "streaming text". The term "streaming" was first used in the early 1990s as a better description for video on demand on IP networks; at the time such video was usually referred to as "store and forward video", which was misleading nomenclature.

Live streaming, which refers to content delivered live over the Internet, requires a camera for the media, an encoder to digitize the content, a media publisher, and a content delivery network to distribute and deliver the content.

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        TECH - UPDATE




YouTube has reportedly launched a new design for its users that is inspired by the "card-like" design Google Now uses on many of its other web and mobile apps.

Google has come up with the design to highlight playlists by putting them front and center in the left sidebar.

According to Tech Crunch, the company also center-aligned the site to make it look better on any screen and give it a feeling similar to the mobile apps you're spending almost half your YouTube time with.

Meanwhile, YouTube also added new icons to the sidebar and introduced a new persistent menu button next to the company's logo in the top-left corner of the screen that will bring up the guide with playlists, subscriptions in the sidebar. 

Apple corporation likes nothing better than a good tease, usually made during one of its grand, defining moments or timed with a special anniversary.

It is now all of 30 years since founder Steve Jobs unveiled the iconic Apple Mac. Trumpeting that success on its website, Apple reminds us that it “was designed to be so easy to use that people could actually use it”.

That sounds blindingly obvious nowadays, but back in 1984 personal computing wasn’t very personal. It was largely confined to an elite of academics and wealthy businesses.

The Macintosh 128K was the first mass-market personal computer to break the mould. It was also the first to feature a graphical user interface and mouse.

“It came with a promise - that the power of technology taken from a few and put in the hands of everyone, could change the world,” says Apple. “That promise has been kept. Today we create, connect, share, and learn in ways that were unimaginable 30 years ago.”

The hint is that Apple has something big up its sleeve that will keep the coffers flowing for the next few decades.

It will need it, if a flagging share price and Wall Street jitters are anything to go by. Although it is awash with cash - €142bn and rising - expectations among investors are so high that Apple cannot be seen to flounder, even for an instant.

Financial traders are more concerned about what Apple will do over the next few months than what they are planning in the years and decades ahead.

This year was to be Apple’s watershed in China, when a long-awaited deal to sell iPhone through China Mobile Ltd, the nation’s largest carrier, would claw back ground from rival Samsung.

Lower-than-expected pre-Christmas iPhone sales and a weak revenue forecast renewed fears about Chinese demand and a tepid global market, wiping 8% off Apple’s share price. The company also warned that revenues may fall in the first quarter of 2014. Apple has not posted a drop in quarterly revenues in more than a decade.

Since then, it has been buoyed by sales of the iPhone and iPad but this year a sense of urgency is growing, with trouble brewing on all sides.

Intense competition in China from Samsung as well as from local rivals like Huawei and Xiaomi is impeding its progress there.

“There’s no doubt that shipments (to China Mobile) are lower than almost anybody expected,” Pacific Crest Securities’ Andy Hargreaves told Reuters. Globally, “the high-end smartphone and tablet markets are saturated, and that’s not going to grow.”

There is a sense of back-to-the-future about all this. In 1995, the company was in trouble with sales of Macs dwindling and other manufacturers making cheaper and smarter products. It had to come up with something new. The funky iMac G3 did the trick and in 1998 Apple was posting profits again for the first time in three years.

The iPod followed in 2001 and the iPhone six years later, with the iPad in 2010 consolidating Apple’s position as the world’s most valuable technology company.

But investors are still not happy. The company forecast sales of to $44bn in the first quarter of this year, but Wall Street had expected even more - $46bn, on average.

So, will a new product do the business once again? There is a range of possibilities:

A bigger iPhone


AEREO IS NOW AVAILABLE ON CHROMECAST

Aereo, the Internet television streaming upstart currently embroiled in a historic Supreme Court showdown with broadcast companies, is finally available for Google Chromecast. Its arrival on Google’s streaming media dongle Thursday comes one week after its intended debut.

Aereo's Android app was updated Thursday with Chromecast support. The Chromecast is a $35 dongle that enables users to wirelessly beam content from their computer, smartphone or tablet to their television.

Chromecast users simply need to download Aereo's Android app, connect their Chromecast and start Aereo and select the "cast" icon.

Aereo's service allows subscribers to stream content from local broadcast networks via a browser or app and record shows to a cloud-based DVR to watch later. Streaming is already supported through Chrome, Safari, Internet Explorer, Firefox, Opera, Roku and AppleTV.

Subscriptions to Aereo's service start at $8 a month for 20 hours of DVR storage and $12 a month for 60 hours of storage. The service is available to residents of New York, Boston, Atlanta, Miami, Houston, Dallas, Detroit, Baltimore, Cincinnati, San Antonio and Austin and the company plans to expand to more cities by the end of the year.

The service has been embroiled in legal battles with major networks who claim Aereo's service violates existing copyright and retransmission laws. The two sides went before the Supreme Court in April and a decision is expected later this month.